Posted by Isra on 11/13/2014 7:11 PM

Dear Daddy,

I have been searching for you my whole life.

You were never lost, never were, and you never will be.

But still I long for the imaginary man that should’ve been, could’ve been, but wasn’t.

Posted by Isra on 7/25/2014 4:02 PM

As a child, it was a constant struggle to separate my father from my desire to practice my religion. 

He made it next to impossible to enjoy prayer, reading Quran, Ramadan, wearing hijab, going to the masjid, and so many other things that should be encouraged and nourished in an adolescent.  [...]

It is unbelievably hard to push forward against negative associations and be able to enjoy your faith when it has been so tarnished by the past

Posted by Isra on 7/17/2014 2:36 PM

When one lives in the solitude of their own mind it can lead them to believe there is no hope, no future, and ultimately no point. When they’ve been told time and again that no one would help or that their life and struggles meant nothing, it becomes easy to fake that smile, the carefree attitude, and quietly slip back into the abyss of sadness once they’re alone again. 

Posted by Isra on 5/27/2014 12:27 PM

An innocent child, she tried to understand the pain that surrounded her.

Resilient, as most children are, she played and laughed, but cried herself to sleep.

From the age she started praying she kept a secret. One that only God knew about. During every prayer, in her quiet conversation with her Lord, she begged Him of a favor: To remove the man called her father from her life or to remove her from his. 

Posted by Isra on 5/22/2014 2:27 PM

Over the course of my life I heard that if I was patient, I would be rewarded. In my adolescence I sought answers by reaching out to different religious leaders. I rarely got a response …and when I did it was the same mantra of endurance and forbearance. Patience in an unrelenting environment does not come easy or free.

Posted by Karla Kellam on 9/27/2013 8:37 AM

Indian film makers are tackling child abuse in an innovative way... by releasing educational videos to YouTube.  One of these was made by documentary film maker, Sanjay Kumar Singh, and is called "Chuppi Todo" (Break the Silence.)

Posted by Karla Kellam on 9/20/2013 8:24 AM

A man in Utah did not lose custody of his children, even though they had been beaten with an electrical cord, due to cultural differences. Whose responsibility is it to educate new immigrants as to cultural norms regarding child discipline, treatment of spouses, etc.?

Posted by GuestBloggers on 8/21/2013 12:04 PM

By Yusra Gomaa  (courtesy of altmuslimah)

Brother and Sister “H-H-Hello, Asalaamu’alaykum. Umm, my name is Amna and I have two young children. The state is terminating my parental rights, and there’s nothing I can do. I didn’t know who else to call. I have one month to find someone before they go up for adoption. Can you please help me find a Muslim to adopt my children?” The mosque director began a three-week campaign in Tennessee to find Muslims both willing and qualified to adopt these two children, but found none.

Posted by GuestBloggers on 4/16/2013 1:41 PM
One out of three Muslims who responded to the survey conducted by Peaceful Families Project and Project Sakinah in 2011 reported experiencing some form of abuse under the age of 18. 
It is time we started having open conversations about violence within our families, time we begin to look at the protection of our children as a communal, 
rather than simply a family responsibility -- and time we redoubled our efforts to learn and practice effective parenting.
Posted by Zerqa Abid on 3/29/2013 10:46 AM

Khalil Wimes, a 6-year-old boy died due to parental abuse in Philly last March. His drug-addict parents starved him for three years. They would beat him with whatever they would find. They had him in a room that had nothing but a filthy, urine-wet mattress. After his death, doctors found his 29 pound body covered with a "sea of scars" and wounds. Full story here.

It's been a year, but I still can't get my head around the fact that this baby was suffering so much for so long and NOBODY around him DID ANYTHING to rescue him. The community has done nothing after his death to protect other kids either. 

What is our communal response to Khalil's death? 

Posted by Zerqa Abid on 7/26/2012 2:07 PM

A major problem in handling the issue of family violence is the lack of funding. Although Muslim Americans raise tens of billions of dollars each year, most of this money is sent overseas in the name of relief efforts. Most of what stays home is spent on building mosques and Islamic schools. Domestic violence shelters and social services organizations hardly get any support from the community across the country.

This has to change. We need to learn, as individuals and as a community, to portion our charity. While it is important to help Muslims all over the world, it is obligatory to help the oppressed, the needy, and the vulnerable at home first. We need to understand that the entire world responds to natural disasters and relief efforts in the most cases, but hardly anybody responds to a child or woman abused behind the closed doors. How that money sent overseas is being used/misused and what impact it really makes is a topic of another discussion.

We also need to understand that the future of the Muslim community is only secured by building healthy communities and nurturing healthy individuals. This goal can only be achieved by addressing various issues that a Muslim American family faces today. The active investment in strengthening our families is a long overdue and avoiding it is a communal crime.

Posted by GuestBloggers on 6/12/2012 10:42 AM

by By Karla Kellam

 A little over a month ago, on April 17, a ten-year-old Muslim boy named Abdifatah Mohamud, was brutally murdered in Buffalo, NY by his stepfather—beaten to death more than 70 times with a rolling pin.  

One month prior to Abdifatah’s death, on March 19, six-year-old Khalil Wimes died at the hands of his parents. 

We cannot dismiss these stories with a pitying shake of the head because we, the Muslim community, share the burden of guilt. We have remained woefully silent on the issue of child abuse and family violence within our communities.

Posted by Zerqa Abid on 5/7/2012 11:54 AM


  Khalil &  Abdifatah
“Khalil was dead from head trauma March 19 when his parents, Tina Cuffie, 44, and Floyd Wimes [aka Latiff Hadi], 48, brought him to Children’s Hospital of Philadelphia. His corpse weighed only 29 pounds and bore a sea of scars across his face and the rest of his body, according to police reports. Authorities believe Khalil suffered beatings at the hands of his parents for as long as two years, and he was photographed with obvious scarring at the same time the social worker was visiting him and his siblings in 2011.” ─ Reports Philadelphia Inquirer.

“On the night of April 17, Ali Mohamad Mohamud tied up his stepson Abdifatah Mohamud, stuffed a sock in his mouth, covered it with duct tape and then beat the boy to death, Buffalo, N.Y.,” police told ABC News affiliate WKBW.

“An autopsy showed that the fifth grader died after being hit more than 70 times with a rolling pin.” --- ABC News.

We as a community seriously need to do something about such parents who torture their kids in all sorts of ways in the name of discipline. Police and children services come later. Where are family members, neighbors and community members? Why is there nobody to stop them? This does not happen in just one night. Instead, such deadly incidents happen after several incidents of lesser severity. In this case, it is apparent that nobody stopped these brutal people at all.

Posted by Hesham A Hassaballa on 4/7/2011 11:24 PM

From where did this come? Where in the Qur'an does it sanction the murder of a woman on the mere accusation of adultery? What sort of barbarity is this?

Posted by GuestBloggers on 9/30/2010 9:10 PM

Written by Rafia Zakaria

The killers of 16-year-old Aqsa Pervez were convicted on June 18. Mohammad Pervez and Waqas Ahmed, Aqsa’s father and brother, were sentenced to life in prison by a jury in Ontario, Canada.

Aqsa was killed after being picked up by her brother from her school bus stop. She was taken to the family home where she was found dead by the police. DNA material belonging to her brother was found under her fingernails and her father confessed to the murder.
According to accounts published in Canadian newspapers, Mohammad Pervez killed his daughter because she did not subscribe to his conservative values. She wanted to get a part-time job and did not want to have an arranged marriage. According to a statement made by Aqsa’s mother, Mohammad Pervez told her that he had killed his youngest child because “the community will say that you have not been able to control your daughter” and “this is my insult, she has made me naked”.

On Dec 10, 2007, the day of her death, Aqsa was tricked into coming back home and then strangled. The cause of her death was deemed to be asphyxiation and evidence showed that Aqsa had fought for her life in her last moments. On the day the sentence was announced, Aqsa’s mother was present in court and pleaded to the judge to spare her husband and son.

Contributors

 

Topics

 

Blog List

In The Beginning
Emotional Literacy -- The Key to Preventing Domestic Violence
Feeling Like an Expert?
Forebearance and the Family
The Heartsick Judge
Letter to a Stranger
Aftershock
Cope
Over
Handcuffed
True Love in Marriage – A Mirage, Why?
Wholeness of Love - The Tranquil Home
Greatness of Women
Stand with Purple
Indian Documentary Film Maker Tackles Child Abuse
Cultural Differences and Child Abuse
Adoption in Islam: Not in my house
The Plight of Abused Muslim Parents
Team Up with Ramadan
Revive the Spirit: Do 4 Things for Aasiya
The Origin of The International Purple Hijab Day
E-Wali--A Good Idea
One Easy Thing to Do to Help Keep Kids Safe
Five Tips on Finances / Your Financial Safety Plan
The Issue of Child Abuse: What We Should Do
It's all about Saving Muslim Lives at Home!
Stop Domestic Violence: Wake Up, Speak Up, Team Up
Please Help Me: The Child Abuse Epidemic
On Shaima Alawadi, family violence, and hate crimes
Hurting Homes
Honor is Gender Neutral
My Khutbah Against Domestic Violence
Abuse of Women is Sadly Endemic
Do we have a Will to End Domestic Violence?
Domestic Violence, Islam and Muslim Women
Domestic Violence: A Violation of Islam
Honor and Terror
Muslims Working Against Domestic Violence
Muslim women wage jihad against violence
Imam Zaid Shakir: The Problem of Domestic Abuse
The Wife-Beating issue and its impact on our community
ALLAH Prohibits Domestic Violence
Does the Quran Tolerate Domestic Abuse?
Inviting Muslims to Respond to Domestic Violence
VOICE TO ACTION: Muslims Against Domestic Violence
SISTERS Annual Tea Honors Muslimat Al Nisaa Shelter
Did We ever Bother to know Muzzammil?
Downtown Chicago Event
He Stood Right Here

 

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Project Sakinah
Dar al Islam
P.O. Box 180
Abiquiu, NM  87510

505.484.8253